COVID-19 Vaccine Myths: Debunked!

Myth (noun)

  • a widely held but false belief or idea

The myths that have been surrounding the COVID-19 vaccines have spread faster...well, faster than the actual virus. It's common and understandable for people to be afraid of something new and quickly developed, but Blue Mountain Hospital is here to debunk the myths and answer some questions you may have about the vaccine:

Myth: The side effects are harmful and dangerous
Truth: There are side effects that can affect people who receive the vaccine such as fever, chills, soreness at the injection site, or headaches and these side effects can last for a couple of hours or a few days. However, the side effects are common and in most cases very mild. Also, the reported side effects from the COVID-19 vaccines are not as severe or as dangerous as the side effects from the COVID-19 virus which can be long lasting.

Myth: I've had the COVID-19 virus, so I don't need to get vaccinated.
Truth: While it is true that those who have had the COVID-19 virus have a period of protection from the virus, experts do not know how long this protection lasts. And, it is possible for people to be reinfected. Because of these facts, it is highly recommended that people who have been infected with the virus receive the vaccine so that they can be fully protected.

Myth: I can't get the vaccine because I am pregnant or trying to get pregnant.
Truth: If you are currently pregnant or are trying to get pregnant, you may get the vaccine without any concern. There is currently no evidence that any of the COVID-19 vaccines have an effect on fertility or cause any issues with pregnancies. Like all vaccines, scientists are continuously studying and reviewing the vaccines for any side effects that have not already been reported. Contact your pre-natal provider and follow any of their recommendations.

Myth: The vaccine could give me the COVID-19 virus.
Truth: Nope! None of the available COVID-19 vaccines contain the live COVID-19 virus. This means that you cannot get the virus from receiving any of the vaccines. Instead, the available vaccine teaches our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus. This process can take a couple of weeks which means that someone who just received the vaccine can still catch the virus if exposed, but the vaccine will not give you the virus.

Myth: The COVID-19 vaccine will alter my DNA.
Truth: No. The COVID-19 vaccines do not change, alter, or interact with your DNA in any way. The genetic material in the vaccines cannot affect or interact with your DNA. The genetic material in the vaccine never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where your DNA is kept.

Myth: I've received both of my vaccination doses so I don't need to wear a mask anymore.
Truth: It can take a couple of weeks for the vaccine to fully protect your body. You should continue to wear a mask for a period of time after receiving your second dose. The length of time depends on current CDC guidelines and the vaccine that you receive. After the allotted time, you should continue to review the current CDC guidelines as to whether or not you should wear a mask. For example, a group of fully vaccinated people can gather indoors without physical distancing or masks. But, if you are in public with unvaccinated people, then you should continue to wear a mask and physically distance.

If you have any additional questions or concerns about the COVID-19 virus or vaccine, we recommend that you contact your health-care provider and review the information put forward by the CDC. Blue Mountain Hospital has partnered with the Utah Navajo Health System to make the vaccine available to the Blanding community and beyond. If you are interested in receiving the vaccine or want more information, please reach out to Utah Navajo Health System.

Resources:

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/is-the-covid19-vaccine-safe#:~:text=Side%20effects%20such%20as%20fever,having%20a%20bad%20case%20of

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/recommendations/pregnancy.html#:~:text=People%20who%20would%20like%20to,19%20vaccines%2C%20cause%20fertility%20problems.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/fully-vaccinated.html

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